Swift – Class (Part II)

By | 30/03/2022

Swift – Class (Part I)


MULTIPLE INITIALIZERS

import UIKit

class User {
    var _userName: String
    var _password: String
    var _email: String
    
    init(UserName: String, Email: String, Password: String) {
        self._userName = UserName
        self._email = Email
        self._password = Password
    }
    
    init(UserName: String, Email: String) {
        self._userName = UserName
        self._email = Email
        self._password = "No Password"
    }
    
    init(UserName: String, Password: String) {
        self._userName = UserName
        self._password = Password
        self._email = "No Email"
    }
    
    init(UserName: String) {
        self._userName = UserName
        self._password = "No Password"
        self._email = "No Email"
    }
    
    func PrintInfo(){
        print("Username: \(_userName)  -  Password: \(_password)  -  Email: \(_email)")
    }
}

var UserComplete = User(UserName: "UserComplete", Email: "user@test.com", Password: "pass123")
var UserNoPassword = User(UserName: "UserNoPassword", Email: "user@test.com")
var UserNoEmail = User(UserName: "UserNoEmail", Password: "pass123")
var UserNoEmailNoPassword = User(UserName: "UserNoEmailNoPassword")

UserComplete.PrintInfo()
UserNoPassword.PrintInfo()
UserNoEmail.PrintInfo()
UserNoEmailNoPassword.PrintInfo() 


If we run this code, these will be the results:


DEINITIALIZER
Deinitialization is a process used to deallocate the memory space before a class instance deallocated. The ‘deinit’ keyword is used to deallocate the memory spaces occupied by the system resources.

import UIKit

class User {
    var _userName: String
    var _password: String
    var _email: String
    
    init(UserName: String, Email: String, Password: String) {
        self._userName = UserName
        self._email = Email
        self._password = Password
    }
    
    init(UserName: String, Email: String) {
        self._userName = UserName
        self._email = Email
        self._password = "No Password"
    }
    
    init(UserName: String, Password: String) {
        self._userName = UserName
        self._password = Password
        self._email = "No Email"
    }
    
    init(UserName: String) {
        self._userName = UserName
        self._password = "No Password"
        self._email = "No Email"
    }
    
    func PrintInfo(){
        print("Username: \(_userName)  -  Password: \(_password)  -  Email: \(_email)")
    }
    
    deinit {
        print("The user \(_userName) has been destroyed")
    }
}

var UserComplete = User(UserName: "UserComplete", Email: "user@test.com", Password: "pass123")
var UserNoPassword = User(UserName: "UserNoPassword", Email: "user@test.com")
var UserNoEmail = User(UserName: "UserNoEmail", Password: "pass123")
var UserNoEmailNoPassword = User(UserName: "UserNoEmailNoPassword")

UserComplete = User(UserName: "UserComplete2", Email: "user@test.com", Password: "pass123")
UserNoPassword = User(UserName: "UserNoPassword2", Email: "user@test.com")
UserNoEmail = User(UserName: "UserNoEmail2", Password: "pass123")
UserNoEmailNoPassword = User(UserName: "UserNoEmailNoPassword2")


If we run this code, these will be the results:


OVERRIDING METHOD
In swift, Overriding is the process in which subclass is fully responsible to change or re-implement the
instance method, instance property and type property which is defined in parent class or superclass.

import UIKit

class User {
    var _name: String
    
    init(Name: String) {
        self._name = Name
    }
    
    func Print(){
        print("Print from print() method \(_name)")
    }
}

class Admin: User{
    override func Print() {
        print("Print from overridden print() method \(_name)")
    }
    
    func PrintNotOverridden(){
        super.Print()
    }
}

var objectUser = User(Name: "User")
var objectAdmin = Admin(Name: "Admin")

objectUser.Print()
objectAdmin.Print()
objectAdmin.PrintNotOverridden()


If we run this code, these will be the results:


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